Drishyam (2013)

  • Written by Jeethu Joseph
  • Directed by Jeethu Joseph

   Repeat Value : 10 / 10     

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Drishyam - Movie Highlights

Malayalam industry (Mollywood) is a small industry when compared in terms of commerce and business but is very rich in content and is experimental with various kinds of subjects. With commercialization, it also had fallen prey to the gimmicks of star based films which failed one after the other. Also Malayalam Cinema has several art films and parallel movies to brag about, but with Drishyam, it is elevated to a world class cinema. Jeethu Joseph brought back the golden days of Malayalam Film Industry which boasted of great author-backed films in the times of Padmarajan, Bharathan, Lohithadas, Sibi Malayil etc. Dhrishyam is Mollywood's entry to world class thrillers and can be credited for bringing Mohanlal back to form. An undoubtedly exceptional film as far the content is concerned, the movie is a must watch for all the audiences of family and thriller movies. It is remade into four other Indian languages including Telugu (Drushyam), Kannada (Drishya), Tamil (Papanasam) and Hindi (Drishyam). It is also being remade in Sinhalese as Dharmayuddaya.

Georgekutty (Mohanlal) manages a cable television business in a small town of Thodupuzha. A film buff, his only interest apart from his family is watching films. He spends most of his time in front of the TV in his small office. A class four school drop-out, Georgekutty is living a contented life with his wife Rani (Meena) and two daughters, elder Anju (Ansiba Hassan) and the younger Anu (Esther Anil). A simpleton and family man loved by all in the neighborhood, except by the corrupt Constable Sahadevan (Kalabhavan Shajon) who has a grudge against George. Life is pretty smooth for the family, till one day his elder daughter bumps into a notorious guy Varun (Roshan Basheer) in a school nature camp. Varun demands sexual favour from her in return of the MMS being deleted, that he captured during their encounter at the nature's camp. Rani intervenes and pleads with Varun to leave their family alone, but Varun refuses. Varun is accidentally killed by Rani and her daughter and they hide his body in a compost pit, which is witnessed by Anu. At morning, Rani tells George about the incident. They learn that Varun was the only son of none other than IG Police, Geetha Prabhakar (Asha Sarath). The story then follows the struggle of George Kutty and his family and how George hatches a master plan to get his family out of this and from the clutches of the police. Thus, begins the cat and mouse game between George and the Police. To what extent does George goes to save his family and to what extent does Geetha, who has handled so many criminals, will be able to extract the truth from them forms the real interesting part of the story/film which has to be watched to be enjoyed thoroughly.

The film takes off as a typical family drama. The first half of the film is intentionally slow-paced and shows to the audience the lighter moments in the family of Georgekutty. The second half is more like a thriller. It is not often that you sit in a theatre with bated breath, never wanting to miss a moment of the film on screen. Drishyam is one such film, a gripping tale that leaves you spellbound. The greatest strength of the film is the script penned by the director himself whose earlier ventures are 'Detective' and 'Memories'. Based on an intricate screenplay that demands an amazing competence to make it convincing, Jeethu Joseph comes out with an impressive finesse. It has all the major ingredients to attract the moviegoers, irrespective of gender, age and cinematic tastes. It starts of like a normal film but by the interval you will be enthralled by the epic twist. Unpredictability is definitely one element that keeps you glued to your seats as you watch the film. The other important factor is that the hero doesn't have a 'larger than life' image. He is just one among us, striving to make both ends meet and at the same time so concerned about his family, which is his world. It has been a long long time since we had Mohanlal playing such a character, so real and so down-to-earth. It is also a treat for all die-hard fans of Mohanlal. But Drishyam is completely a director's movie and is cracker of a thriller genre. The film's climax is outstanding and a masterstroke in terms of writing. The tag line of the movie 'Visuals Can Be Deceptive' holds true.

Mohanlal was endearing in roles where he played the common man. But, as his stature grew, we saw less of the kind of roles that had brought him stardom. As a big star, he played those 'larger than life' roles that had the fans clapping and whistling at the superhuman feats of their idol. The subtlety that was the hallmark of his earlier films became increasingly rare and the sly sense of humour gave way to a louder variety. With Drishyam he is back and is spellbinding. That is too simple a statement to describe the magic he has created on screen. Mohanlal is at his vintage best, making Georgekutty appear completely genuine. He plays a semi-literate man who is nevertheless intelligent. He is conversant in many languages, a skill that he acquired watching all those films on TV. The legendary actor, who in his 35-year career has explored umpteen roles, gets into the skin of George Kutty. Playing a common man is something that Mohanlal has always done with natural ease and in Drishyam he wins hands down. Meena as his wife Rani holds her own opposite Mohanlal and is one of the highlights of the film. Asha Sharath is impressive while Siddique is his usual self. Roshan Basheer, Irshad, P Sreekumar do justice to their respective characters. But the biggest surprise is Kalabhavan Shajon, who excells as policeman Sahadevan. Surprising viewers with an incredible performance as a cop with negative shades, he is simply outstanding.

Excellent script, direction and superb performances - 'Drishyam' is an elegantly crafted piece of film which Lal and Joseph can proudly hold close to their hearts.

It is definitely a must watch.